27/07/18 - AMA highlights urgency of increased aged care funding

Key Points

  • The Australian Medical Association has released survey results indicating that 1 in 3 GPs are planning to cut back on visits to residential aged care facilities
  • One of the key reasons offered was the inadequacy of Medicare funding
  • Aged care funding has been cut repeatedly in recent years
  • The AMA survey highlights the general inadequacy of funding for ageing services

The Aged Care Industry Association (ACIA) has welcomed the Australian Medical Association’s release of survey results suggesting that 1 in 3 General Practitioners who visit residential aged care facilities (RACFs) are planning to cut back in the next two years.

The Association, which represents aged care providers, said that this highlighted the funding pressures being felt all across the ageing services sector.

CEO Luke Westenberg said, “The feedback from GPs suggests that Medicare funding for services to aged care residents is inadequate. Coming after repeated funding cuts in recent years including abolition of the Payroll Tax Supplement, indexation freezes and reductions in subsidies, this just highlights that aged care is not receiving the support it needs.”

“Provision of high-quality aged care can only be achieved with appropriate levels of funding. If inadequate funding leads to fewer GP visits, more residents will end up in hospital – rather than in the facility in which they have chosen to live and receive care.”

“Unnecessary hospitalisation is a bad outcome for residents – and, in the end, it costs the Commonwealth more money that proper care funding would have.”

ACIA calls on the Federal Government to acknowledge the unsustainability of current funding, and to commit to a funding level that will support older Australians.

“You can’t get blood from a stone, and you can’t sustain, let alone increase, care quality with constant funding cuts. It’s time aged care was funded properly, so we don’t end up with withdrawal of services and distress for older Australians.”

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26/07/18 - Aged care resident receives Legion D’Honneur, France’s highest honour

Key Points

  • Resident at Estia Hope Valley receives France’s highest award for service in World War Two

A resident at Estia Hope Valley has been awarded the Legion d’Honneur, France’s highest award, for his service in World War Two.

Albert Denham, along with two other honorable World War II veterans, was awarded the insignia of The Légion d’Honneur (Legion of Honor).

The Légion d’Honneur (Legion of Honor) was created by Napoleon a little more than 200 years ago. The awarding of this medal is the most solemn occasion for France to pay tribute to remarkable men and women, citizens of France or of other countries around the world. It is the highest decoration bestowed in France, which recognises distinguished services for France.


The award recognised Mr Denham’s service on the HMS Eskimo in the Normandy campaign and the Arctic convoys to Russia.

Luke Westenberg, Aged Care Industry CEO, said, “These occasions help us to remember the important contribution made by older Australians, and the inspiring stories they bring.”

“Being able to support and care for people such as Mr Denham is what aged care is all about. ACIA is proud to share Mr Denham’s story as an example of the residents that our members support every day.”

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14/06/18 - Aged Care Industry supports Labor’s call for increased aged care funding, not inquiries

Key Points

  • Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has indicated that the aged care industry needs more funding
  • Mr Shorten has indicated a royal commission may not be necessary
  • The Aged Care Industry Association supports Mr Shorten’s call for increased funding
  • The Aged Care Industry Association believes it is time for action, not inquires
  • Aged care has been the subject of numerous recent inquiries
  • Aged care funding has been cut repeatedly in recent years
  • The Aged Care Industry Association calls for bipartisan commitment to increasing aged care funding

The Aged Care Industry Association (ACIA) has welcomed the recognition by Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten that the aged care industry needs more funding – not more inquiries.

The Association, which represents aged care providers, said that the sector had suffered repeated funding cuts in recent years, but that residents’ care needs had been increasing.

CEO Luke Westenberg said, “The care needs of the residents we support has increased significantly in recent years – over one-third of residents now have a diagnosis of dementia. The sector needs more funding, not less.”

“Residential aged care supports around 190,000 older Australians every day. Average Commonwealth funding is only $46,700 per person – to supply all the care a resident needs.”

“We have had multiple inquiries into bad practices in the sector – it is time to acknowledge that aged care needs more investment.”

ACIA welcomes Mr Shorten’s recognition that aged care needs more funding, and is willing to work with the Labor Party to ensure a fair deal for aged care providers.

“We hope the Government agrees that aged care needs more funding, and that we will see bipartisan support for increased funding.”

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05/04/18 - Aged Care Industry calls on new SA government to audit state-run aged care facilities

Key Points

  • The SA Government operates 26 services that provide residential aged care but do not fall under the Commonwealth’s regulatory supervision
  • The Labor Government abandoned a promised audit of these facilities
  • The Aged Care Industry Association calls on the new Liberal Government to audit quality of care in State Government-run aged care facilities

The Aged Care Industry Association (ACIA) has called on the new Liberal State Government to audit the quality of care provided in State Government-run facilities.

The Association, which represents aged care providers, said that the SA Government operated 26 sites providing residential care as Multi-Purpose Services (MPS), with 607 aged care places.

These sites were not subject to quality monitoring by the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency. After the scandal at Oakden, the previous Government promised an audit of these services; however, this promise was abandoned.

CEO Luke Westenberg said, “There are 26 State facilities not monitored by the Commonwealth Government. The Labor Government promised to audit the quality of care in State-run facilities after Oakden – but never did.”

“South Australians deserve to know that the State Government is providing high-quality care – after Oakden, the only way to be sure is with a full audit.”

“The new Government is in a position to show its commitment to caring for older South Australians with a thorough audit to make sure there are no more Oakdens hiding in SA Government facilities.”

ACIA is keen to work with the new government to ensure all South Australians receive care of the quality they expect and deserve.

“ACIA calls on the Liberal Government to show South Australians that a new government has a new approach – one that finds and fixes any problems, rather than hiding them like the previous Government did at Oakden.”

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05/04/18 - Liberal government should stop Labor’s special dealing

Key Points

  • The previous State Government entered into significant deals without transparent process
  • These included:
    • Transfer of State assets at the Repat
    • Transfer of State assets at Modbury Hospital
    • Transfer of State assets at the now ACH Vita site
    • Contract for service management at Oakden
  • Terms of these deals are not publicly known
  • Opaque and uncompetitive processes risk taxpayer funds and have potential to compromise quality of care
  • Aged Care Industry Association calls on new Liberal Government to release details of these arrangements
  • Aged Care Industry Association calls on new Liberal Government to protect taxpayers through proper process

The Aged Care Industry Association (ACIA) has called on the new Liberal State Government to ensure open and competitive processes in dealing with State assets and contracts, rather than Labor’s secretive dealings with preferred organisations.

The Association, which represents aged care providers, said that the previous State Government had entered into significant deals with a single provider without public competition or scrutiny.

CEO Luke Westenberg said, “The industry doesn’t want to see special deals for one provider, and no opportunity for scrutiny or competition.”

“Taxpayers can’t know they are getting value for money, if they don’t know what they are getting – or for what money.”

“ACIA calls on the new Government to give taxpayers, older people and the community, confidence that these arrangements provided value for money and proper guarantees around quality of care.”

“We call on the new Government to release details of:

  • Transfer of State assets at Modbury, the Repat and what is now ACH Vita
  • Contracts with ACH Group to manage the Oakden service
  • State funding provided to ACH Group
  • Any tender or competitive process entered into to ensure value for money and quality of care.

Mr Westenberg noted that the Liberal Party had pledged to re-open the Repatriation General Hospital, and welcomed this commitment to listening to the community.

“The Liberal Party has come into office showing it can listen, and can reverse bad decisions. ACIA encourages the new Government to reverse the Labor practice of favouring a single provider, and to introduce competition to ensure quality of care and value for money.”

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